Example of a good cover letter for an internship

In such inquiries we have more to do with words than with things, with names than with persons, with phrases than with facts. Such are our views, and I trust it will be seen (the experimental part at least,—the theory will be explained in due course) that we have endeavoured, however imperfectly, to reduce them to practice. In relating that Sanctio, Bishop-elect of Orleans, when accused of simony by a disappointed rival, took the oath of negation with seven compurgators, he adds that the accused thus cleared himself as far as he could in the eyes of man.[173] That the advantages it offered to the accused were duly appreciated, both by criminals and judges, is evident from the case of Manasses, Archbishop of Reims. “Cases,” as a friend of mine justly observes, “were this feeling fully established, would be relieved without proceeding to the utmost degree of severity; and we might confidently anticipate that when the decided excellence of such a system, as regards moral, intellectual, and physical management, is adequately understood, the premonitory symptoms, often slight and various, but generally significant, will no longer be disregarded: and incipient mental disease, arrested by the judicious means there pursued, will not be allowed to assume a form and magnitude constituting the most awful calamity to which man is subject:” and why should it be allowed to do so, when it may be asserted, without contradiction, that functional disorders of the brain, are less liable to end in disorganization, and possess a greater power of readjustment, than any other part of the human system—woe unto us if it were not so. Our methods of selecting books, and their results, doubtless need improvement, but so do those of all the other libraries we know. This is all borderland material between library and museum. A good-natured man never loses his native happiness of disposition: good temper is an estate for life; and a man born with common sense rarely turns out a very egregious fool. has sworn.”[158] A century later, in a compilation of the Lombard law, it appears: “That which the accused has sworn is true, so help me God.”[159] The form specified in Bearn, at a period somewhat subsequent, is curt and decisive: “By these saints, he tells the truth;”[160] while the code in force in Normandy until the sixteenth century directs an oath identical in spirit: “The oath which William has sworn is true, so help me God and his saints.”[161] It will be observed that all these, while essentially distinct from the oath of a witness, are still unqualified assertions of the truth of the principal, and not mere asseverations of belief or protestations of confidence. This feature in its history is well exemplified in a document containing the proceedings of an assembly of local magnates, held in the year 888, to decide a contention concerning the patronage of the church of Lessingon. This drapery too is drawn so tight, as to express beneath its narrow foldings the exact form and outline of any limb, and almost of every muscle of the body. He was gifted with a _second-sight_ in such matters: he believed whatever was incredible. O God! Some of them have been printed in translations in the “_Historias_” of Lizana and Cogolludo, and of some the originals were published by the late Abbe Brasseur de Bourbourg, in the second volume of the reports of the “_Mission Scientificque au Mexique et dans l’ Amerique Centrale_.” Their authenticity has been met with considerable skepticism by Waitz and others, particularly as they seem to predict the arrival of the Christians from the East and the introduction of the worship of the cross. If the reader of a book cannot do this, he is not regarded as at all skilled. There is no doubt that the perception of beauty becomes more exquisite (‘till the sense aches at it’) by being studied and refined upon as an object of art—it is at the same time fortunately neutralised by this means, or the painter would run mad. His behaviour is genteel and agreeable who can maintain his cheerfulness amidst a number of frivolous disasters. The sight of a smiling countenance, in the same manner, elevates even the pensive into that gay and airy mood, which disposes him to sympathize with, and share the joy which it expresses; and he feels his heart, which with thought and care was before that shrunk and depressed, instantly expanded and elated. But you, who have found out their certain Source, May with a happier Hand divert their Course. You must argue as well as bow yourself into the good graces of these modern Amazons. “In my own mind,” he writes, “I have always considered them the work of some disciple of the Jesuit Fathers, who had taken a fancy to the Taensa poetry.” This emphatic rejection of their aboriginal origin has led me to look over the volume again, as it seemed to me that example of a good cover letter for an internship if such was the opinion of the learned editor he should certainly have hinted it to his readers. CHAPTER IV. It may be said of him truly, ‘Age cannot wither, nor custom stale His infinite variety.’ Indeed, it is not possible he should become tedious, since, even if he repeats the same thing, it appears quite new from his manner, that breathes new life into it, and from his eye, that is as fresh as the morning. But if, notwithstanding, they should be unfortunate, to give ourselves any anxiety upon that account, seems to be no part of our duty. Nor were the first followers of Copernicus more fortunate in their answers to some other objections, which were founded indeed in the same ignorance of the laws of motion, but which, at the same time, were necessarily connected with that way of conceiving things, which then prevailed universally in the learned world. The difficulties are, however, not really so formidable as they might at first seem to be. _Eros._ Ay, noble Lord. Such quality depends on the relations of concrete words, on the one hand, to primitive objective perceptions at their root, and, on the other, to the abstract general ideas of which they are particular representatives; and besides this, on the relations which the spoken word, the articulate sound, bears to the philosophic laws of the formation of language in general.[282] In his letter to Abel-Remusat he discusses the theory that the American languages point to a once higher condition of civilization, and are the corrupted idioms of deteriorated races. They talk about much the same things, pictures, poetry, politics, plays; but they do it worse, and at a sort of vapid second-hand. in his Neapolitan code. My attention was drawn to the necessity of a more systematic plan of service in the New York Free Circulating Library on assuming charge in 1895. A painted statue, though it may resemble a human figure much more exactly than any statue which is not painted, is generally acknowledged to be a disagreeable and even an offensive object; and so far are we from being pleased with this superior likeness, that we are never satisfied with it; and, after viewing it again and again, we always find that it is not equal to what we are disposed to imagine it might have been: though it should seem to want scarce any thing but the life, we could not pardon it for thus wanting what it is altogether impossible it should have. “I shall drown, if I fall in the water,” means that, of the various results of my falling in the water, one of them will be that I shall drown. It was thus rich where a library is usually poor and _vice versa_. Those two vices, however, though resembling, in some respects, as being both modifications of excessive self-estimation, are yet, in many respects, very different from one another. As for ordinary cases of success and failure, they depend on the slightest shades of character or turn of accident—‘some trick not worth an egg’— There’s but the twinkling of a star Betwixt a man of peace and war; A thief and justice, fool and knave, A huffing officer and a slave; A crafty lawyer and pick-pocket, A great philosopher and a blockhead; A formal preacher and a player, A learn’d physician and manslayer. Nothing on record.—He was one of those who was formerly kept naked on loose straw. The merchant, as the expert, has always had the upper hand in the contest of wits. In like manner I beg to point to the library consolidations in New York and Brooklyn as an evidence that such removal of duplication elsewhere would enable us to supply omissions in library service. To show the propriety and advantages in this method of proceeding, I shall state the important fact, that some few have at once been cured, without removal from home, by the powerful influence of its candour and honesty.—And in all cases, when, after all this labour and delicacy, they are removed, and are, subsequently, on the same principles, and in the same spirit, treated with every possible indulgence, and the greatest degree of forbearance, even overlooking many lesser faults, and waiting, until, as we say, “they break out and commit themselves,” in some very decided manner, so as to furnish us (even in their own estimation) with a very palpable plea to abridge them of their indulgencies, they have then forced upon them the conviction of their error, and are obliged example of a good cover letter for an internship to acknowledge the justice of any change that is made. (Raro mulieres donare solent.) Humanity consists merely in the exquisite fellow-feeling which the spectator entertains with the sentiments of the persons principally concerned, so as to grieve for their sufferings, to resent their injuries, and to rejoice at their good {169} fortune. Don Quixote and Sancho were a kind of twins; and the jests of the latter, as he says, fell from him like drops of rain when he least thought of it. Shakespear, it is true, had the misfortune to be born before our time, and is not one of ‘those few and recent writers,’ who monopolise all true greatness and wisdom (though not the reputation of it) to themselves. But for this there could be no desire, no pursuit of anything. Remy, where the abbot presided over the lists and they were guarded by the royal officials.[505] In 1239 the Bishop of Orleans contested with the king as to the right of the former to the jurisdiction of the duel in his diocese;[506] and in a judgment rendered in 1269, concerning a combat waged within the limits of the chapter of Notre Dame of Paris, we find that the first blows of the fight, usually known as _ictus regis_ or _les cous lou roi_, are alluded to as _ictus capituli_.[507] How eagerly these rights were maintained is apparent from numerous decisions concerning contested cases. Thus, even the messenger of bad news is disagreeable to us, and, on the contrary, we feel a sort of gratitude for the man who brings us good tidings. “Genius” says Carlyle, “is nothing but an infinite capacity for taking pains.” To which a modern critic replies, “On the contrary, genius is an infinite capacity for doing things without taking any pains at all.” Both are right. It may, as Taine suggests, have been served up as a kind of “Appetitsbischen” between meals, in order to stimulate the palates of the gallants who frequented the theatre; though it is difficult to attribute this function to what by common consent was intended to provoke mirthful laughter. A kind of standardization of which we can not have too little is that controlled by the man who takes himself as the standard–his own ideas, prejudices and habits. What is gained in formality, is more than lost in force, ease, and perspicuity. Few of them would have been considered within the library’s scope fifty years ago.

an letter internship for a of cover example good. When all her almost exhaustless fund of sympathy failed, it was always found a sufficient check, and at once to call forth our patient’s powers of self-control, for Mrs. This stripping is essential to the art, to which is also essential a flat distortion in the drawing; it is an art of caricature, of great caricature, like Marlowe’s. The one is anxious about small matters for their own sake; the other attends to them only in consequence of the scheme of life which he has laid down to himself. Here the conditions indicated, a relief from restraint and a sudden expansion of joyous activity, are patent to all. Yet there is no evidence of a general intention to punish. sternly prohibited this in 1216, but ineffectually, as is seen by a complaint of the English clergy, in 1237, in which they mention the case of the Prior of Lide, who had thus recently suffered the penalty. There are more people in London than any where else; and though a dwarf in stature, his person swells out and expands into _ideal_ importance and borrowed magnitude. of England was endeavoring to return through Germany from the crusade, it was by the torture of his page that the identity of the royal traveller was discovered, and he was delivered to his enemy the Duke of Austria.[1516] These are evidently rather sporadic and exceptional cases than indications of any systematic introduction of the practice. It formed, however, a prejudice in favour of both, and the learned began to examine, with some attention, an hypothesis which afforded the easiest methods of calculation, and upon which the most exact predictions had been made. Peter.[1515] When Richard I. Those new visible objects at once, and as it were of their own accord, assumed both the distance and the magnitude of the great tangible objects which they represented. consented, at the request of his subjects, to dispense with it in Hanover; while in Baden it continued to exist until 1831. The English, which came to be spoken afterwards, and which continues to be spoken now, is a mixture of the ancient Saxon and this Norman French. He may possibly not understand, himself, why he gets ahead so fast. In him this instinctive power, not having been exerted at the proper season, may, from disuse, have gone gradually to decay, and at last have been completely obliterated. About 1670 Georg Frese, a merchant of Hamburg, distinguished for piety and probity, published an account, the truth of which was vouched for by many respectable eye-witnesses, stating that a friend of his named Witzendorff, who had bound himself to a young woman by terrible oaths, and then had proved false and caused her death, fell into a despairing melancholy. It has been said that this principle is of itself sufficient to example of a good cover letter for an internship account for all the phenomena of the human mind, and is the foundation of every rule of morality. This humility appears sometimes to sink them into idiotism. London: Printed for J. Louis, so rarely at fault in the details of civil administration, saw in the duel not only an unchristian and unrighteous practice, but a symbol of the disorganizing feudalism which he so energetically labored example of a good cover letter for an internship to suppress. The pronouns are— ? Je cherche en vain dans l’etre purement sensitif cette force intelligente, qui superpose, et puis qui prononce; je ne la saurois voir dans sa nature. This at once tends to limit the range of savage laughter; the pressure of custom is too tyrannical to allow of a full display of the odd and irregular in human behaviour. There is neither. A glance at the language employed in describing laughable objects suggests the large scope of the odd. As single and individual objects thus excite our Wonder when, by {332} their uncommon qualities and singular appearance, they make us uncertain to what species of things we ought to refer them; so a succession of objects which follow one another in an uncommon train or order, will produce the same effect, though there be nothing particular in any one of them taken by itself. It is by no means sufficient that, from ignorance or mistake, esteem and admiration should, in some way or other, be bestowed upon us. Those men of letters who value themselves upon what is called fine writing in prose, approach somewhat to the sensibility of poets. So of any number of actions. These regular alternate states of excitement and restlessness, of depression and sleep, last each for several days, and this for many years’ duration. It is generally in the night-time indeed, or in a strange place, that the circumstance happens; but as soon as the light dawns on the recollection, the obscurity and perplexity of the senses clear up. chap. In like manner those who love the book merely for its fine clothes, who rejoice in luxurious binding and artistic illumination, and even those who dwell chiefly on its fine paper and careful typography, are but inferior lovers of books. Chapman borrowed from Seneca; Shakespeare and Webster from Montaigne. INTRODUCTORY. When the feast is ready, the priest approaches the table, dips a branch of green leaves into a jar of _pitarrilla_, and asperges the four cardinal points, at the same time calling on the three persons of the Christian Trinity, and the sacred four of his own ancient religion, the _Pah ah tun_. The same is true, though in a less degree, of the chipped stones and bones which Ameghino exhumed from the lacrustine deposits of the Pampas, although he proves that these relics were the products of tribes contemporary with the extinct glyptodon and mylodon, as well as the fossil horse and dog. It is impossible to convey any adequate conception of its appalling nature. Good screw! I note these peculiarities, because they may be expected to recur in other systems of ikonomatic writing, and may serve as hints in interpreting them. They are therefore less reasonable subjects of vanity than the magnificence of wealth and greatness; and in this consists the sole advantage of these last.