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The only intimacy I never found to flinch or fade was a purely intellectual one. The circular arched entrance north of the transept appears to be built of Caen stone, and though plain, attests the origin of at least this part of the building. Wherever a Claude, a Wilson has introduced his own portrait in the foreground of a picture, we look at it with interest (however ill it may be done) feeling that it is the portrait of one who was quite happy at the time, and how glad we should be to change places with him. It is a common observation, that few persons can be found who speak and write equally well. Such things can be had for the asking, and there is usually no one place in a town where they are all assembled. The French and Italian languages have, both of them, the remains of a conjugation; and all those tenses of the active voice, which cannot be expressed by the possessive verb joined to the passive participle, as well as many of those which can, are, in those languages, marked by varying the termination of the principal verb. At the same time he designated the spot in the vestibule where the fire was to be built to heat the caldron or the ploughshares, and sprinkled them all with holy water to prevent diabolical illusions. Extension, at least any sensible extension, supposes divisibility. It is he, who is so well known for the whimsical impiety of using to say, that, had he been buy science letter consulted at the creation of the universe, he could have given good advice; an apophthegm which is supposed to have proceeded from his dislike to the intricate system of Ptolemy. He is, in short, a great man by proxy, and comes so often in contact with fine persons and things, that he rubs off a little of the gilding, and is surcharged with a sort of second-hand, vapid, tingling, troublesome self-importance. Nay, more, as a forced performance, it presumably has a disagreeable feeling of irksomeness as its accompaniment. The deception took place _before_; now it is removed. Any one knows that when he desires a very special or definite thing it is often impossible to find it, though it may be next door. Those who were destined for its Elysian years were divinely designated by the diseases or accidents of which they died. To standardize a work of art would be to kill it. If in adventuring to lay this little Piece at your Highnesses Feet, and humbly beg your Royal Protection of it, I have presum’d too far, be pleas’d to impute it to your own, most gracious Goodness, the knowledge of which encourag’d me. In fact, every system of management that does not make this principle, of mildly calling forth and gently exercising this internal principle of self-control on matters that are least connected with the diseased parts of the brain, a constant and primary object of attention, is not merely defective, but exhibits very great ignorance of the attributes of mind, as well as of the causes and nature of its maladies; and it follows that, as a system, it must be without any clear principle to guide its physical and moral treatment. Valentini and others. For there is no faculty in the mind by which future impressions can excite in it a presentiment of themselves in the same way that past impressions act upon it by means of memory. Both are examples of the injury that may be done by what we may call auto-standardization. If the ideas merely succeeded one another, or even co-existed as distinct images, they would still be perfectly unconnected with each other, each being absolutely contained within itself, and there being no common act of attention to both to unite them together. Only too easily can it overdo the “flushing” part, and inundate and destroy when it should merely cleanse. They are neither long nor short; they are neither broad nor narrow; they are neither deep nor shallow. But to reach this hidden purport, one must study all the ideas which the name connotes, especially those which are archaic. No matter how near you may be to dying of thirst, you will not be likely to visit an obviously dry sand-bank in search of water. The moment after, I, too, may fall a victim to the ambuscade, in {144} which case I probably stop laughing and become the subject of a different emotion. (_Doctor Faustus_) The verse accomplishments of _Tamburlaine_ are notably two: Marlowe gets into blank verse the melody of Spenser, and he gets a new driving power by reinforcing the sentence period against the line period. Down the river it sailed, veering from bank to bank, and pointing out, as with a finger, the various possessions of the Abbey, till at last, on reaching the disputed lands, it miraculously left the current of the stream, and forced itself into a narrow and shallow channel, which in high water made an arm of the river around the meadows in question. The teachers express this, when they admit the public library at all into the educational pantheon, by saying that it may “continue the work of the school.” This is a one-sided way of looking at the matter–as one-sided as it would be to say that the function of the school is to prepare people for the use of the public library–a statement no less and no more true than the other. Not that here, too, we are unable to find a resemblance between laughter and play; for, as we know, much of what we call play or sport has its serious interest, and the player, like the laugher, may easily slip across the line which divides the playful from the serious attitude. This difficulty is more than doubled upon the painter who draws from a living subject. Not so many years ago, one could hear in the West of England the {261} jibes which the people in one small town or district were wont to hurl at those in another. According to Bracton, in the thirteenth century, in all actions arising from contracts, sales, donations, etc., when there was no absolute proof, the plaintiff came into court with his _secta_, and the defendant was bound to produce two conjurators for each one advanced by the plaintiff, the evidence apparently preponderating according to quantity rather than quality.[238] From the context, it would appear that the _secta_ of the plaintiff consisted of his friends and followers willing to take the oath with him, but not absolutely witnesses. After all, what is there in these harmless half-lies, these fantastic exaggerations, but a literal, prosaic, _Cockney_ translation of the admired lines in Gray’s Ode to Eton College:— ‘What idle progeny succeed To chase the rolling circle’s speed Or urge the flying ball?’ A man shut up all his life in his shop, without any thing to interest him from one year’s end to another but the cares and details of business, with scarcely any intercourse with books or opportunities for society, distracted with the buzz and glare and noise about him, turns for relief to the retrospect of his childish years; and there, through the long vista, at one bright loop-hole, leading out of the thorny mazes of the world into the clear morning light, he sees the idle fancies and gay amusements of his boyhood dancing like motes in the sunshine. The mind of man alone is relative to other things, it represents not itself but many things existing out of itself, it does not therefore represent the truth by being sensible of one thing but many things (for nature, it’s object, is manifold) and though the things themselves as they really exist cannot go out of themselves into other things, or compromise their natures, there is no reason why the mind which is merely representative should be confined to any one of them more than to any other, and a perfect understanding should comprehend them all as they are all contained in nature, or _in all_. Those martyrs to the cause of humanity, in short, who run the gauntlet of the whole catalogue of unheard-of crimes and afflicting casualties, who ransack prisons, and plunge into lazar-houses and slave-ships as their daily amusement and highest luxury, must generally, I think (though not always), be prompted to the arduous task by uneasy feelings of their own, and supported through it by iron nerves. The grand principle of treatment is, to avoid even the appearance of unnecessary restraint, and to treat them with apparent confidence: such a plan of procedure will almost invariably excite their secret but proudest endeavours to preserve and retain this confidence. His ways of thinking and feeling isolate him from both the Elizabethan and the later Caroline mind. Footnote 67: The poet himself, standing at the bottom of it, however diminutive in appearance, was a much greater proof of his own argument than a huge, shapeless lump of ice. A friend of his said, ‘If I pull off my hat to him in the street, it costs me fifty pounds, and if he speaks to me, it’s a hundred!’ Only one other reflection occurs to me on this subject. Serious as is the case of those who are not employed at all, it is as nothing compared with those who are employed badly. Yet he mentions that in one part, which I judge to be somewhere in Louisiana, the natives were accustomed to erect their dwellings on steep hills and around their base _to dig a ditch_, as a means of defence.[63] Our next authorities are very important. The most ancient that I have met with occurs in an Anglo-Saxon formulary which is supposed to date from about A.?D. ‘_Charlotte._ Upon my word, madam, it is a very humane disposition you have been able to arrive at, and your family is much obliged to the Doctor for his instructions.’—ACT II. It was not, however, till much later (113th day) that the noises became broken up into the discrete sounds of a laugh. And even in _France_, a Country that treats our Sex with more Respect than most do, [Sidenote: _Original of the Salique Law._] We are by the _Salique Law_ excluded from Soveraign Power. They consist only in doing what this exquisite sympathy would of its own accord prompt us to do. Some of the worst books are artistically praiseworthy and would be well worth a place of honor on our shelves if their beauty alone were to move us. You can only speak to be understood, but this you cannot be, except by those who are in the secret. The field is vast and demands many laborers to reap all the fruit that it promises. The spectator enters by sympathy into the sentiments of the master, and necessarily views the object under the same agreeable aspect. In what direction is the library moving in each of these respects? He is mightily disposed to laugh, but is half afraid of making some blunder. Of the former are a manuscript by the Licentiate Zetina of Tabasco, a native of Tihosuco, and some notes on the subject by Don Jose Maria Lopez, of Merida, and the late Dr. Whatever a dog’s powers of jocosity when uninstructed by man, it seems safe to set down a good share of his highly developed sense of fun to his profound susceptibility to man’s educative influence; which buy science letter again (as the difference between the educability of the dog and of the cat at once shows) implies an unusual strength of those instincts of attachment to man which have made him almost the type of fidelity. The Ordonnance of 1670 was drawn up by a committee of the ablest and most enlightened jurists of the day, and it is a melancholy exhibition of human wisdom when regarded as the production of such men as Lamoignon, Talon, and Pussort. Berendt, personally known, I doubt not, to some present, obtained a curious Aztec love-song from the lips of an Indian girl in the Sierra of Tamaulipas. It was the same in colour. A presumably intelligent man, a graduate of the public schools, occupying a position under the city, recently remarked to one of our library people that he spent his holidays usually at one of the nearby recreation parks. And the poet cannot reach this impersonality without surrendering himself wholly to the work to be done. The course of currents on the British shores is ascertained to be as winding as that of ordinary rivers. Upon these sentiments are based those acts which unite man to man in amicable fellowship and mutual interchange of kindly offices, thus creating a nobler social compact than that which rests merely on increased power of defence or aggression. Footnote 36: Nearly the same sentiment was wittily and happily expressed by a friend, who had some lottery puffs, which he had been employed to write, returned on his hands for their too great severity of thought and classical terseness of style, and who observed on that occasion, that ‘Modest merit never can succeed!’ Footnote buy science letter 37: During the peace of Amiens, a young English officer, of the name of Lovelace, was presented at Buonaparte’s levee. There is no virtue without propriety, and wherever there is propriety some degree of approbation is due. against a clause intended to diminish the abuse of torture by inquisitors, he argued that it was a reflection on the Inquisition, because the episcopal courts were subject to no such restrictions on its use.[1620] The Church carried this blessing with it wherever it went. But this periodicity, which I also advocate, will be more fully examined in the third section of the Essay on Atmospheric Influence, in which some observations will be ventured on lunar influence. But vanity is always founded upon the belief of our being the object of attention and approbation. The imagination, by means of which alone I can anticipate future objects, or be interested in them, must carry me out of myself into the feelings of others by one and the same process by which I am thrown forward as it were into my future being, and interested in it. They themselves seem often to be ashamed of the regularity of their own manners, and, not to be out of the fashion of their trade, are fond of affecting that levity, which is by no means natural to them. Romantic drama tended, accordingly, toward what is sometimes called the “typical,” but which is not the truly typical; for the _typical_ figure in a drama is always particularized—an individual. From all which I infer, that when languages were beginning to be formed, nouns adjective would by no means be the words of the earliest invention. Extending our inquiry beyond reference-material, we may next assert that there are many semipopular books of a denominational character, sermons by a favorite divine, advice to young people, words of comfort to those in buy science letter trouble, which it is to the interest of Christian people to see more widely read. Halloran, in his practical observations on Insanity, says,—“Chronic insanity is that form of the disease, which, having passed through the acute and convalescent stages, has assumed the more permanent character, and is known by the frequent exacerbation of the original accession; also, finally, under circumstances of less violence, and with symptoms subacute in relation to the primary affection.” He adds,—“There are few Practioners of the most ordinary discernment, who will not feel themselves disposed to acknowledge that cases of insanity, precisely of this form, compose the greater majority of those committed to their care.” He further says,—“That these paroxysms are for the most part periodical in their approach; for though of shorter duration, they continue pertinaciously unyielding.” From the observations which I have to suggest, it will be seen, that I conceive in some instances, in opposition to Dr. The height to which tides rise, and the violence and velocity of the currents, depend in a great measure on the actual configuration of the land, the contour of a long line of continental or insular coast, the depth and breadth of channels, the peculiar form at the bottom of the seas—in a word, on a combination of circumstances which are made to vary continually by many igneous and aqueous causes, and among the rest, by the tides and currents themselves. The consideration of the complexity of the sentiment may throw light, further, on its modifications among the peoples which are correctly spoken of as endowed with it. How then does the author reconcile these common or analogous qualities, and the complex impressions from all the senses implied in poetry (for instance) with his detached, circumscribed, _local_ organs? They make no distinct interval, but are considered as a sort of excrescence of the verse, and are in a manner counted for nothing. This was used in connection with the measure called _tuvic_, the same that I have described as the Maya _kok_, obtained by closing the hand and extending the thumb. The local clergy on questions of religion, and often on others, too; the school principal on history and economics, the organist on music, the village doctor on science–some such men will always be found able and glad to give advice on these subjects or some others; and the place is small indeed that does not include one or two enthusiasts, collectors of insects or minerals or antiquities, who have made themselves little authorities on their pet hobbies and may possibly be the greatest or the only living authorities on those local phases that particularly interest the local librarian. All audible laughter is for him an ill-bred display, at once unsightly as a bodily contortion, and, as a lapse from the gravity of reason, a kind of mental degradation. Nor must we forget that our own ideas of propriety are constantly changing. The responsible decision in these matters rests, of course, in most libraries, with a committee of some sort; but if the librarian is one in whose judgment this committee has confidence (and no other should hold the position at all) he will have a practically free hand. By this I mean, of course, that the author himself must speak correctly; his characters may be ignorant persons and he will naturally make them talk accordingly. I could easily summon numberless other analogies from classic, from Persian, from Turanian, from Semitic sources, to show that these notions were almost universal to the race of man. St. There may, it is true, be room in the pessimist’s creed for a grim irony, of which, indeed, we find a trace now and again in the writings of Schopenhauer and his followers; but for laughter pure and simple, or even for laughter mellowed by the compassion which the {399} pessimist bids us cultivate, there seems to be no breathing-space. The golden rule here is direct personal contact; and don’t forget the last syllable–tact. They reflect that mercy to the guilty is cruelty to the innocent, and oppose to the emotions of compassion which they feel for a particular person, a more enlarged compassion which they feel for mankind. Would you awaken the industry of the man who seems almost dead to ambition, it will often be to no purpose to describe to him the happiness of the rich and the great; to tell him that they are generally sheltered from the sun and the rain, that they are seldom hungry, that they are seldom cold, and that they are rarely exposed to weariness, or to want of any kind. Although this word is apparently a synthesis of _ce_, one, _maitl_, arm, and means “one arm,” it is uniformly rendered by the early writers _una braza_, a fathom. Themselves so little did those Sages know, That to their Failings We their Learning owe. Belcourt, in his Grammar of the Sauteux, an Algonkin dialect, states that the pause may completely change the meaning of a word and place it in another class; it is also essential in that language in the formation of the tenses.[343] This is the case in the Guarani of South America. Solana was an able man, acquiring thoroughly the Maya tongue, and left in his writings many notes on the antiquities of the country.[223] Therefore we may put considerable confidence in what Lizana writes on these matters. But if we wish to consummate and refine this pleasure by understanding it, to distil the last drop of it, to press and press the essence of each author, to apply exact measurement to our own sensations, then we must compare; and we cannot compare without parcelling the threads of authorship and influence. To give a reason for any thing is to breed a doubt of it, which doubt you may not remove in the sequel; either because your reason may not be a good one, or because the person to whom it is addressed may not be able to comprehend it, or because _others_ may not be able to comprehend it. Mr. All constitutions of government, however, are valued only in proportion as they tend to promote the happiness of those who live under them. This irregularity of sentiment, which every body feels, which scarce any body is sufficiently aware of, and which nobody is willing to acknowledge, I proceed now to explain; and I shall consider, first, the cause which gives occasion to it, or the mechanism by which Nature produces it; secondly, the extent of its influence; and, last of all, the end which it answers, or the purpose which the Author of nature seems to have intended by it. The first, heredity, denotes the accumulation of experiences and consequent structural modifications acquired by the race during the process of its adjustment to its environment; the manifestation of the result of this experience in behaviour is called instinct. Yet this, and more, does not affect the contention that popular opinion, just because it is {407} popular, is almost completely relieved of that necessity of finding reasons for its assertions which presses heavily upon a minority; and, what is more serious, is subject to various and potent influences which are just as likely to lead to error as to truth. He then asked his European visitor to perform the office for him. Their mutual regard renders them happy in one another, and sympathy, with this mutual regard, makes them agreeable to every other person. In the presence of clownish ignorance, or of persons without any great pretensions, real or affected, we are very much inclined to take upon ourselves, as the virtual representatives of science, art, and literature. In this we find that the executioner was not to charge more than a peso for torturing a prisoner, while the notary was entitled to two reales for drawing up a sentence of torture, and one real for each folio of his record of its administration and the confession of the accused.[1621] CHAPTER VII. “O creature of water, I adjure thee by the living God, by the holy God who in the beginning separated thee from the dry land; I adjure thee by the living God who led thee from the fountain of Paradise, and in four rivers commanded thee to encompass the world; I adjure thee by Him who in Cana of Galilee by His will changed thee to wine, who trod on thee with His holy feet, who gave thee the name Siloa; I adjure thee by the God who in thee cleansed Naaman, the Syrian, of his leprosy;—saying, O holy water, O blessed water, water which washest the dust and sins of the world, I adjure thee by the living God that thou shalt show thyself pure, nor retain any false image, but shalt be exorcised water, to make manifest and reveal and bring to naught all falsehood, and to make manifest and bring to light all truth; so that he who shall place his hand in thee, if his cause be just and true, shall receive no hurt; but if he be perjured, let his hand be burned with fire, that all men may know the power of our Lord Jesus Christ, who will come, with the Holy Ghost, to judge with fire the quick and the dead, and the world!